Chimichurri Recipe - 16

Chimichurri (familia Mispireta-style)

Many of my friends and acquaintances have asked me for my famous chimichurri recipe, and here it is! But be warned, this is not your typical chimichurri recipe.

2011 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog. Here’s an excerpt: A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 1,500 times in 2011. If it were a cable car, it would take about 25 trips to carry that many people. Click here to see the … Continue reading

Papas con Maní Recipe - 09

Papas con maní

Papas con maní (“potatoes with peanuts”) is a sort of Andean-Peruvian comfort food. Put simply, you make a creamy savory sauce out of ground toasted peanuts, and then serve it hot over sliced potatoes. It makes a great vegetarian meal, as it’s meat-free but packed with protein. This dish has been a favorite at my Peruvian Food Orgies, among vegetarians and carnivores alike. It’s sort of like eating potatoes with molten peanut butter than has been flavored with garlic and onions. Delicious.

Living in Peru Magma

Peruvian Sushi

So, my mom sent me this link from Living in Peru on a hot new sushi joint in Lima. This shouldn’t be surprising; in fact, it’s inevitable in Peru. You see, Peru has had massive populations of Chinese and Japanese Peruvians ever since the abolition of slavery in the 19th century. First Chinese and then … Continue reading

Pastel de Choclo Recipe - 30

Pastel de Choclo

Pastel de choclo (“corn cake”) is a dense, savory cake that combines the salty-sweetness of corn muffins, the density of meatloaf, and the layering of shepherd’s pie. It involves a layer of ground corn cooked over a layer of pino (seasoned ground beef), often baked in a paila, a thick earthenware bowl. A vegetarian version can be prepared by omitting the pino and cooking the ground corn as a solid cake. Pastel de choclo is indigenous to both Peru and Chile, where large-grained white choclo (Quechua for fresh white corn) is plentiful. Since it is often eaten cold and has a dense, solid consistency, it is a common “street food” sold from the stands of food vendors.

Anticuchos Recipe

Anticuchos

Ah, anticuchos. The thought of them brings me back to childhood, and the slightly acidic aroma of the marinade sizzling over charcoal conjures up memories of family picnics in the park in Canada where, despite all the talk of multiculturalism, we were reminded of how foreign we were. Nothing quite says “not from around these parts” like barbecued organ meats, eh? In a nutshell, anticuchos is a grilled meat dish, made by marinating cubes of beef heart in a strongly acidic marinade and then grilling them on skewers.

Ceviche Recipe

Ceviche de Pescado

It’s currently 37ºC in Berlin, and the last thing I want to do is turn on the stove. I just made ceviche this afternoon (although the pictures date from an earlier version back in Chicago), and so I was inspired to put together this recipe while the fish marinates. This ceviche was made with corvina, but it can be adapted to nearly any sort of seafood by changing the marinating time and the contents of the marinade.

Ocopa_(Peru)

Ocopa

Having made a sweet-spicy salsa for my first recipe, I thought I’d follow up with a creamy-savory-spicy salsa (i.e., Spanish for “sauce”). Ocopa is a traditional Andean recipe, associated with the Southern-Peruvian mountain city of Arequipa. The flavor base is a combination of roasted ají mirasol (Peruvian yellow peppers, also known as ají amarillo) and huacatay, which is an Andean black mint that the inhabitants of that region use in a lot of their cooking. The textural base to this dish is a mixture of fresh cheese (queso fresco or a similar farmer’s cheese) and evaporated milk, thickened with crackers and nuts.

Mango Salsa Recipe - 23

Mango-Jalapeño Salsa

Considering that I got the title for this blog from a pun on a culinary technique and a…erm…”corporeal technique” (hint: both techniques involve getting soaked), why not make the inaugural recipe one about macerating? To be clear: maceration involves softening or breaking up a food by soaking it in liquid. In this case, we’re using the mango’s own juices (drawn out by a bit of salting) along with some lime juice to soften it into a sticky-spicy-sweet salsa that goes great with salty tortilla chips. This recipe is entirely my own invention, but it uses the principles of any Latina salsa.

Welcome!

If you’re reading this, you’re probably a reader of my old blog, Luis In Paris. I’ve retired that blog and started up two new blogs, including this one. As you might recall, I had a lot of food-related posts in my old blog, including recipes. This blog is all about these elements from my old … Continue reading

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